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Kotor

Kotor

Kotor

Kotor is situated in the southeastern part of the Bay of Kotor beneath Mount Lovcen and is the cultural, educational and sporting centre of this area. You’re as likely to find a cool little bar, or a shop stocked with the latest Apple gadgets behind an antique façade while exploring its narrow laneways and 800-year-old chapels. Equally lovely, day or night, the imposing stone walls of this medieval fortress town stretch high into the mountain itself and, in the evening, are lit to brilliant effect. A tunnel connects Kotor to Tivat, the drive is just fifteen minutes, but arriving by boat on a sunny day is a memorable experience worth waiting for.

The first Slav tribes settled here in the 12th century and Kotor was ruled by the Nemanjic dynasty until 1420 when the Venetians took control, where they remained until 1797 and the Napoleonic wars. After the stormy period from 1797 to 1814 when this area was alternately under the Russians, French, Austrians and Montenegrins, at the Vienna Congress in 1814, Kotor became the constituent of the Austro-Hungary Monarchy and remained under the rule of Austro-Hungary until 1918 when this region became a part of Yugoslavia until its disintegration.

  • Dinner at Galion with panoramic views over the glittering harbour and illuminated stonewalls of the Old Town
  • Afternoon people-watching over lattes on the wi-fi blanketed patio of Hotel Vardar
  • Grab a slice of thin crust pizza at Pronto
  • Climb the city walls to San Giovanni fortress for a breathtaking view of the Bay
  • Stock up on fresh figs, cherries and olives at the daily al fresco market
  • Learn Kotor’s nautical heritage at the Maritime Museum
  • After dinner drinks at the intimate Hotel Astoria Bar
  • Dance all night at Maximus Nightclub

Kotor is a captivating mix of Baroque, Venetian and Austrian architecture. A UNESCO World Heritage site full of cobblestone streets, polished marble piazzas and noble palazzos, this beautifully preserved town is also renowned for its many cathedrals. The splendours of the 1200-year-old St. Tryphon’s Cathedral include ancient gold relics and original Greek frescos, while the floor of St. Lucas’s Church, built in 1195, consists of tombstones dating from when burials were carried out in the church itself. Home to numerous sacred sites, with church bells ringing constantly in its café ringed squares, unlike many historic towns, Kotor, is a living, vibrant place with year-round activity.